Capturing the culture that makes Detroit what it is.

Author

Khary Frazier

Khary Frazier has 20 articles published.

Stretch Money a Fearless Rebel of Detroit Hip-hop

in Introduction/WAE Music by

Stretch Money’s a rap star. For over a decade his music has been played at Family Reunions, Roller Rinks, and even every strip club throughout Detroit. Eastside’s own son has embraced working with all rappers throughout Detroit regardless of style, age, and background. His voice and pattern in speaking arms him naturally to stand out in conversation and on the song he does as well. Charting the Billboard 100 throughout the 2000’s & 2010’s his time in jail changed his ethics in work and decision making. We explore creativity, free-styling, and leadership. Currently, Stretch Money is working with Fearless Rebels teaming with Crane Novacane producing music, clothing, and content. Opportunities and platforms for a team of young hungry Detroiters is his vision and through creativity, he’s doing it. We both go in depth about the lyricism of Tupac Shakur and examine the talent and skill displayed by Tupac on his song ‘(Shed) So Many Tears,’ (featured on Tupac Shakur’s 1995 ‘Me Against the World’ album). Stretch also opens up about his focus on always learning about the process, nature, and self-exploration. Listen to a deep and creative discussion with Stretch Money on Detroit is Different.

Breaking away from the noise and learning yourself for the Good & Bad

Stretch Money’s a rap star. For over a decade his music has been played at Family Reunions, Roller Rinks, and even every strip club throughout Detroit. Eastside’s own son has embraced working with all rappers throughout Detroit regardless of style, age, and background.

Books, documentaries, and free-styling are the key to Rapping

Stretch Money’s a rap star. For over a decade his music has been played at Family Reunions, Roller Rinks, and even every strip club throughout Detroit. Eastside’s own son has embraced working with all rappers throughout Detroit regardless of style, age, and background.

How marketing and getting the word out is essential in Rap

Stretch Money’s a rap star. For over a decade his music has been played at Family Reunions, Roller Rinks, and even every strip club throughout Detroit. Eastside’s own son has embraced working with all rappers throughout Detroit regardless of style, age, and background.

Visit www.detroitisdifferent.com today and also download the App on Apple’s App Store or Google’s Play Store TODAY!

From DJing to Producing events at Carnegie Hall: Lumumba Reynolds

in Introduction by

Lumumba Reynolds is a creative consultant specializing in sound reinforcement, light design, audio engineering, videography, video editing, photography, and event production. Work with Mosaic Youth Theatre, Detroit’s Fellowship Chapel, the Detroit Windsor Dance Academy, Detroit High School of Fine and Performing Arts, and dozens of organizations and people all have benefited from the services of Studio Lumumba. In this podcast interview we explore his start into production, performing, and love for music. He opens up about starting off a career as a DJ and blossoming into a creative institution. Starting a technical career working at Specs Howards School of Broadcast Journalism, the New Dance Show with Henry Tyler & RJ Watkins, and music video shoots with World One Records. Lumumba tells the story of meeting his wife on the set of a hip-hop music video and how that led to 25 years of marriage with Mayowa Reynolds. The podcast is full of thought-provoking, comedic, and Detroit perspective. Listen to the Detroit is Different podcast interview with Lumumba Reynolds.

Detroit LOVES the New Dance Show

Lumumba Reynolds is a creative consultant specializing in sound reinforcement, light design, audio engineering, videography, video editing, photography, and event production. Work with Mosaic Youth Theatre, Detroit’s Fellowship Chapel, the Detroit Windsor Dance Academy, Detroit High School of Fine and Performing Arts, and dozens of organizations and people all have benefited from the services of Studio Lumumba.

How a met my wife on the set of a Hip-hop Music Video

Lumumba Reynolds is a creative consultant specializing in sound reinforcement, light design, audio engineering, videography, video editing, photography, and event production. Work with Mosaic Youth Theatre, Detroit’s Fellowship Chapel, the Detroit Windsor Dance Academy, Detroit High School of Fine and Performing Arts, and dozens of organizations and people all have benefited from the services of Studio Lumumba.

Hip-hop provides learning, teaching, and growing opportunity

Lumumba Reynolds is a creative consultant specializing in sound reinforcement, light design, audio engineering, videography, video editing, photography, and event production. Work with Mosaic Youth Theatre, Detroit’s Fellowship Chapel, the Detroit Windsor Dance Academy, Detroit High School of Fine and Performing Arts, and dozens of organizations and people all have benefited from the services of Studio Lumumba.

Visit www.detroitisdifferent.com today and also download the App on Apple’s App Store or Google’s Play Store TODAY!

Amp Fiddler & Lauren Hood, the Music & the People

in Introduction by

Detroit is a place that intersects arts and advocacy often. Dr. Martin Luther King’s ‘I have a Dream’ speech was originally recorded by Milton Henry and released on Motown records. Dudley Randall of Broadside Press provided laureates of the Black community a platform to explore stories of police brutality, racial discrimination, and human rights as a premise and platform for a voice. The talents of Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni, and Haki Madhubuti all were given a national stage from the streets of Detroit’s Broadside Press.


The friendship and love between Amp Fiddler & Lauren Hood carry the tradition on. Amp Fiddler is the musical genius that’s always the coolest person in the room. Born and still residing in the Pershing HS neighborhood Amp travels the world and comes home to Detroit’s Eastside. His unique blend of Funk, Soul, and R & B was crafted through his work with George Clinton and late great brother Bubs Fiddler. His welcoming spirit to encourage creativity provided Slum Village and Detroit’s J Dilla a place to record, learn, and perform hip-hop in the 1990’s. J Dilla who is recognized internationally this February 11 as music’s premiere producer began producing at Amp Fiddler’s home studio.

How Amp Fiddler helped J Dilla start his career

Amp Fiddler shares how his studio was the training ground for J Dilla to learn studio engineering, drum programming, and more. Block away from Pershing HS was a state of the art recording studio that Slum Village first had the chance to record, produce, and create.

Amp Fiddler shares how his studio was the training ground for J Dilla to learn studio engineering, drum programming, and more. Block away from Pershing HS was a state of the art recording studio that Slum Village first had the chance to record, produce, and create.

Lauren Hood is from the music world but passion is for Black people. Detroit westsider is a speaker, thinker, and point of access for many Detroiter’s who feel left out of the ‘New Detroit.’ Years of experience in record promotions, concert planning, and party design led her back to Detroit as stories of her home town’s direction seemed unbalanced. Today, her relationships to thousands of Detroit’s are expanding daily as she is connecting her passion to community advocacy. The racial divide and awareness of internal and external challenges throughout the Black community is the work Hood embraces.

Speaking up on behalf of your People

Lauren Hood shares what and when to act on the call, willingness, and courage to speak up for Black people. Also, having the boldness to loss something to keep your integrity.

Lauren Hood shares what and when to act on the call, willingness, and courage to speak up for Black people. Also, having the boldness to loss something to keep your integrity.

Master Percussionist & Master Engineer: Carl ‘Butch’ Small

in Introduction by

Learning percussion from listening alone led Carl ‘Butch’ Small to travel the world with the Undisputed Truth, the Dramatics, Parliament, and the Four Tops. Small’s understanding of music led to a respect, knowledge, and love for studio engineering which guided him to production, arrangement, and composition for Bootsy Collins at the height of his success in the 1970’s & 1980’s. Butch Small was a centerpiece providing all the sounds you notice but can’t recognize in records like Parliment’s ‘Tear the Roof Off,’ Dr. Dre & Tupac Shakur’s ‘California Love,’ and LJ Reynolds ‘Key to the World.’


Also, his love and support of his son led him to start Detroit’s flagship hip-hop record label World One Records. His encouragement of his son DJ Los moved him into open one of Detroit’s first studio’s welcoming rappers to perform, release, and shares their music with the world. Acts like Kaos & Maestro, DICE, and Nikki D all were given a national stage from a studio on 6 Mile road run by Butch Small. In the 1980’s and 90’s at Shantinique’s Music, Harmony House, and White’s Records World One Record releases rivaled the success of NWA, Public Enemy, & Salt-n-Pepa selling tens of thousands records. Small’s life is a rich narrative which makes and keeps Detroit so Different. Work with Tupac Shakur, Don Davis, Ortheia Barnes, David Ruffin, Mariah Carey, Dr. Dre, RJ Latest Arrival, are just some of the people who have relied upon the percussionist with golden hands and a better ear.

How Detroit’s flagship label for Hip-hop music World One Records started

Butch Small talks about how he started World One Records out of support and love of his son DJ Los.

Butch Small talks about how he started World One Records out of support and love of his son DJ Los.

How a drummer for Detroit became a lead engineer for Death Row Records

Butch Small talks about the phone conversation with Dr Dre that led to Death Row Records sending him thousands of dollars to drive cross country and work alongside Suge Knight, Dr Dre, and Tupac Shakur.

Butch Small talks about the phone conversation with Dr. Dre that led to Death Row Records sending him thousands of dollars to drive cross country and work alongside Suge Knight, Dr. Dre, and Tupac Shakur.

Keep Reading

Amp Fiddler Music

in WAE Music by

Detroit based Amp Fiddler is a celebrated soul/funk musician who has shared stages and studios with everyone from Prince and George Clinton to Primal Scream and underground Detroit producer Moodyman. Amp also played a pivotal role in bringing Slum Village to global attention and was a friend and collaborator with their producer, the late J Dilla. His warm, expansive mellifluous music takes stylistic cues from all these encounters, but emerges as earthy, supremely relaxed, and rooted in the funk and soul that Amp feels most connected to. And, as he suggests, it is music for the head as much as food for the heart and soul.

Amp Fiddler’s 1st Show with the Enchantment’s

Amp Fiddler talks about his first professional show at Detroit’s Masonic Temple with the Enchantment.

Amp Fiddler talks about his first professional show at Detroit’s Masonic Temple with the Enchantment.

After learning piano as a child, Fiddler studied music at Oakland and Wayne State Universities, and with the jazz great Harold McKinney. He joined a do-wop outfit, The Enchantments, as a teen, and then in 1983 received his big break when a friend, Bernie Worrell the Parliament/Funkadelic keyboardist passed a tape of his playing to George Clinton. Bernie was leaving the mothership, and Amp ended up replacing him, touring with Clinton and the P-Funk mob for more than a decade. He signed with Elektra and released an album with his brother, Mr. Fiddler, in 1990, but the record proved too eclectic for the label to work out how to sell.

Amp’s low profile through the 1990s can be put down to both raising a son, and a remarkable talent for landing background work on important records. He was asked to sit in on a session for a demo after an acquaintance spotting him walking down a New York street, and when the artist Maxwell was signed, Amp ended up helping him make his acclaimed Urban Hang Suite debut.

His first solo album “Waltz of a Ghettofly” set an impressive benchmark for Amp’s future music to match. With Afrostrut he showed how to follow up with a cult classic, replacing some of Ghettofly’s looser jam-based compositions with tighter, more traditional song forms, and as a consequence his lyrics, which had tended towards the universal but unspecific, became more solidified. “I’m always happy with the songs I write, regardless of what anybody thinks,” he emphasizes, “But I guess we all have something we have to grow towards, and there ‘s always areas for learning. WE all have to do better at something.

Living with George Clinton in 1980’s LA saved Amp Fiddler

Amp Fiddler talks about how George Clinton welcomed him into his LA home to help save his life and keep him creative.

Amp Fiddler talks about how George Clinton welcomed him into his LA home to help save his life and keep him creative.

RUNning Rebel (Acoustic) featuring Joey Spina

in WAE Music by

Khary WAE Frazier featuring Joey Spina. The gumbo of Blues & Hip-hop represented well on this record officially featured on the ‘Preaching to the Choir’ 20008 release by Frazier. This was previously unreleased and a special feature for you!

Running Rebel Lyrics:

Chorus
The Rebels are running and coming and coming
The rebels are running and coming
I’m a Rebel


Verse One

By any means necessary so my mind military
As I carry out the visions of the visionary
To the cemetery/ and it vary how I carry what I carry
Got weapons from the streets and weapons from the library
So it’s no telling what’s up in my mind
And it’s no telling what’s off on my side
Reparations ain’t nothing but a riot away
a moltov cocktail in the president’s face
Burn the Whitehouse down for Katrina’s sake
Take some land for ourselves the American way
They not red in the face they red in neck
A savage respect when he faced with his death
Fuck a ballot initiative you see what we living in
Nigguz ain’t got nothing and we ain’t getting shit
But I got a plan for the Brooks Brothers gentleman
For today’s slave master a Nat Turner of this millennium
Pitch forks and hoes now gats and Girbauds
Timberlands and shanks that’s razors to the throats
Living out the actions of Huey Newton quotes
Fueled by the fire of what Chuck D spoke
My peoples army study Marcus Garvey, Nikki Giovanni,
Peter Tosh, and Bob Marley, Muhammed Ali
Cause the teachings of the system doing nothing for me
Revolution on the institution what we need
Verse Two
I have an American Dream but reality ghetto
Public school education got me stuck in the middle
No money no job no food no hospital
Its like no way out opportunity ain’t a little
And it’s so hard for us to survive
Cancer diabetes and Black on Black crime
And the HIV got us dropping like flies
This is the way that we live out our lives
The constitution need some resolutions
Started by the revolution
I’ll do it I’ll prove it If I have to start the movement
We’ll sit down and talk it out or we’ll keep fighting through it
Black power on them bitch ass cowards to turn em’ sour
Take it up with anybody if they got a fucking problem
Whether cop or civilian it may take a million
But the rebels with me rebels and they rebels that’s killing

Dan Aldridge the Civil, Human, Black, & Spiritual Rights Leader

in Introduction by

From sharing a barber with Malcolm X to having Dorothy Height get you enrolled in college Dan Aldridge has a unique story. Aldridge was born in Harlem but has made Detroit his home since the 1960’s. We explore his work too many stories: him losing a job with Chrysler because his stance against Chrysler profiting from Apartheid in South Africa; his friendship with Milton Henry & CL Franklin; and how he was the rebel in Mayor Jerome Cavanagh’s office and a leader in Mayor Coleman Young’s office. Watch and listen to the Detroit is Different interview with Dan Aldridge.

Mayor Cavanagh Rebel was a Mayor Young Leader

From sharing a barber with Malcolm X to having Dorothy Height get you enrolled in college Dan Aldridge has a unique story. Aldridge was born in Harlem but has made Detroit his home since the 1960’s.

Losing a job for a stance against Chrysler profiting from Apartheid in South Africa

From sharing a barber with Malcolm X to having Dorothy Height get you enrolled in college Dan Aldridge has a unique story. Aldridge was born in Harlem but has made Detroit his home since the 1960’s.

Jackie Berg of the HUB

in Introduction by

Do you want to know what’s happening in Detroit communities? Do you want to find out what neighborhood groups, block clubs, and businesses outside of downtown Detroit give to the city? The HUB is a true voice for Detroit. The HUB was founded by Jackie Berg. I had a one on one heart to heart with Jackie about her inspiration to start the HUB from the late Sam Logan who led the Michigan Chronicle for years. Jackie also talks about how corporate sales became a gateway for her to grow a love for Detroit neighborhoods. Watch and listen to the Detroit is Different interview with Jackie Berg.

Telling inclusive stories for all people in Detroit

You want to know what’s happening in Detroit communities? Do you want to find out what neighborhood groups, block clubs, and businesses outside of downtown Detroit give to city? The HUB is a true voice for Detroit. The HUB was founded by Jackie Berg.

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