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Amp Fiddler

Amp Fiddler & Lauren Hood, the Music & the People

in Introduction by

Detroit is a place that intersects arts and advocacy often. Dr. Martin Luther King’s ‘I have a Dream’ speech was originally recorded by Milton Henry and released on Motown records. Dudley Randall of Broadside Press provided laureates of the Black community a platform to explore stories of police brutality, racial discrimination, and human rights as a premise and platform for a voice. The talents of Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni, and Haki Madhubuti all were given a national stage from the streets of Detroit’s Broadside Press.


The friendship and love between Amp Fiddler & Lauren Hood carry the tradition on. Amp Fiddler is the musical genius that’s always the coolest person in the room. Born and still residing in the Pershing HS neighborhood Amp travels the world and comes home to Detroit’s Eastside. His unique blend of Funk, Soul, and R & B was crafted through his work with George Clinton and late great brother Bubs Fiddler. His welcoming spirit to encourage creativity provided Slum Village and Detroit’s J Dilla a place to record, learn, and perform hip-hop in the 1990’s. J Dilla who is recognized internationally this February 11 as music’s premiere producer began producing at Amp Fiddler’s home studio.

How Amp Fiddler helped J Dilla start his career

Amp Fiddler shares how his studio was the training ground for J Dilla to learn studio engineering, drum programming, and more. Block away from Pershing HS was a state of the art recording studio that Slum Village first had the chance to record, produce, and create.

Amp Fiddler shares how his studio was the training ground for J Dilla to learn studio engineering, drum programming, and more. Block away from Pershing HS was a state of the art recording studio that Slum Village first had the chance to record, produce, and create.

Lauren Hood is from the music world but passion is for Black people. Detroit westsider is a speaker, thinker, and point of access for many Detroiter’s who feel left out of the ‘New Detroit.’ Years of experience in record promotions, concert planning, and party design led her back to Detroit as stories of her home town’s direction seemed unbalanced. Today, her relationships to thousands of Detroit’s are expanding daily as she is connecting her passion to community advocacy. The racial divide and awareness of internal and external challenges throughout the Black community is the work Hood embraces.

Speaking up on behalf of your People

Lauren Hood shares what and when to act on the call, willingness, and courage to speak up for Black people. Also, having the boldness to loss something to keep your integrity.

Lauren Hood shares what and when to act on the call, willingness, and courage to speak up for Black people. Also, having the boldness to loss something to keep your integrity.

Amp Fiddler Music

in WAE Music by

Detroit based Amp Fiddler is a celebrated soul/funk musician who has shared stages and studios with everyone from Prince and George Clinton to Primal Scream and underground Detroit producer Moodyman. Amp also played a pivotal role in bringing Slum Village to global attention and was a friend and collaborator with their producer, the late J Dilla. His warm, expansive mellifluous music takes stylistic cues from all these encounters, but emerges as earthy, supremely relaxed, and rooted in the funk and soul that Amp feels most connected to. And, as he suggests, it is music for the head as much as food for the heart and soul.

Amp Fiddler’s 1st Show with the Enchantment’s

Amp Fiddler talks about his first professional show at Detroit’s Masonic Temple with the Enchantment.

Amp Fiddler talks about his first professional show at Detroit’s Masonic Temple with the Enchantment.

After learning piano as a child, Fiddler studied music at Oakland and Wayne State Universities, and with the jazz great Harold McKinney. He joined a do-wop outfit, The Enchantments, as a teen, and then in 1983 received his big break when a friend, Bernie Worrell the Parliament/Funkadelic keyboardist passed a tape of his playing to George Clinton. Bernie was leaving the mothership, and Amp ended up replacing him, touring with Clinton and the P-Funk mob for more than a decade. He signed with Elektra and released an album with his brother, Mr. Fiddler, in 1990, but the record proved too eclectic for the label to work out how to sell.

Amp’s low profile through the 1990s can be put down to both raising a son, and a remarkable talent for landing background work on important records. He was asked to sit in on a session for a demo after an acquaintance spotting him walking down a New York street, and when the artist Maxwell was signed, Amp ended up helping him make his acclaimed Urban Hang Suite debut.

His first solo album “Waltz of a Ghettofly” set an impressive benchmark for Amp’s future music to match. With Afrostrut he showed how to follow up with a cult classic, replacing some of Ghettofly’s looser jam-based compositions with tighter, more traditional song forms, and as a consequence his lyrics, which had tended towards the universal but unspecific, became more solidified. “I’m always happy with the songs I write, regardless of what anybody thinks,” he emphasizes, “But I guess we all have something we have to grow towards, and there ‘s always areas for learning. WE all have to do better at something.

Living with George Clinton in 1980’s LA saved Amp Fiddler

Amp Fiddler talks about how George Clinton welcomed him into his LA home to help save his life and keep him creative.

Amp Fiddler talks about how George Clinton welcomed him into his LA home to help save his life and keep him creative.

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